Monday, May 4, 2020

I Killed My Friend flickr

A femulator at Hanford High School
(Richland, WA) in 1981 
I killed my flickr account.

Because of the vast quantity of images I had posted on flickr, I needed a “Pro” account, which only cost $25 per year when I signed up for it back in 2015. Last year, the price increased to $50 per year.

Friday, I received a PayPal receipt indicating that flickr was now charging $7 per month ($84 per year). That was the last straw and I killed my Pro account as quick as a Playboy bunny.

I actually had only a few dozen personal photos on the site, but I also had nearly 5,000 photos of womanless events that Starla culled from online high school yearbooks. I hope to find a new, less expensive home for those images real soon now.




Source: Beyond the Rack
Source: Beyond the Rack



A womanless wedding, circa 1910 in Waterbury, Connecticut.
A womanless wedding, circa 1910, put on by the Boys Club in Waterbury, Connecticut. Not the greatest femulations, but I am posting the image for two reasons: (1) Waterbury is my hometown and (2) womanless weddings in Connecticut were rare – in fact, this is the only Connecticut womanless wedding I am aware of.

11 comments:

  1. ...just from the walk... she's no civilian!

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    Replies
    1. Fiona you mean Hartford HS? Oh no doubt she is NO civilian!

      Delete
    2. Hanford High School is the correct name of the school... located in Richland, Washington

      Delete
  2. sorry but speaking of flickr is one of the best site to find pics of beautiful cds and it hasa a lot of tg froups
    take a lok at myy blog
    https://t-girlsonflickr.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks so much , dear, for unearthing what is not only the sole picture of a Connecticut womanless wedding, but also what very well may be the earliest picture of a womanless wedding. I have a collection on flickr with over 1600 womanless wedding pictures, but the earliest one I know of was in 1918.

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  4. Womanless events was something I never heard of until I've been reading your blog. This concept is somewhat interesting but perplexing and I would like to learn more about them. Without having done the research, it seems like these events were not necessarily pro-trans but a way to exclude women and treat them like second class citizens, an unfortunate dynamic that has been too long a part of our culture. Just as unfortunate, this still exists today with women earning less for the exact same jobs as their male counterparts. While there is a certain appeal for the woman in me in that these events occurred, I also can't help feel that they were a way to suppress women. It's too bad that we don't have events like these that promote trans women and are supported by cis women who would provide education, a loving environment and support to trans women like us. I'd be interested in hearing your take, Stana, on my thoughts.

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    Replies
    1. AnonymousMay 05, 2020

      Please enlarge the photo to 250% and note a number of MEN are actually WOMEN dressed as MEN. Also note the happy faces and the relaxed poses of some of the women whilst 'homme-u-lating'.
      My wife has commented on the fact, (long before she knew I was a crossdresser) that when she was much younger, her father and grandfather were part of a 'Womanless Wedding' which was held in the sanctuary(!) of the of the Methodist Church, in a rural, conservative North Carolina town. The whole town was there to witness (gawk?).
      More significant, was that these two men were prominent businessmen in their own separate professions.
      Apparently, these 'weddings' were some sort of effort at charity fund raising. Donation for admission to the event?
      Why did these men, indulge? Why do any of the males in High School
      indulge in the potential of being humiliated? Perhaps it is strictly 'BECAUSE THEY CAN!', and escape any derision from the prevailing societal norms.
      Exclusion of women to the event? Unlikely.
      I am reminded of the time Jerry Seinfeld was waiting in the dress section of the department store, that he was so close to the merchandise, it was hard to resist the temptation....
      Aint it so!
      Velma

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  5. AnonymousMay 05, 2020

    A link to wikipedia on Womanless weddings. Photo in site too, at another Methodist church.
    Velma
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Womanless_wedding

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  6. AnonymousMay 05, 2020

    Stana, your reference to 'My Friend Flicker' resolved one of my long repressed childhood traumas.....
    Most readers here will NOT know the television show from the 1950's "My Friend Flicka". I never saw a one of the them- quite intentionally.
    Two brothers from 'one block over' had named their large, ill tempered German Shepherd dog 'Flicka'--presumably after the television show character, but at that time I never heard of the show. The brothers would shout at the dog: 'Sick'em, Flicka' and the dog would bare teeth and bark at us. Needless to say, these two guys were not the most popular on the block.
    Then the television show "My Friend Flicka" aired on Saturday Afternoon, after morning cartoons and I resolved to damn well NOT watch a TV show that featured an ill tempered dog.
    Only today, I googled the title of the show and found "Flicka" was actually a horse!
    So much for childhood delusions and traumas...
    Velma

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